Hiding objects in a Microsoft Access database

It may be that there are tables and queries in your Access database which have been created for development purposes but do not need to be seen by the general users of the database. In this case, the objects can be hidden.

To hide objects in Microsoft Access 2003 or earlier:

Select the object in the database window.

Click View – Properties or the Properties button.

Activate the Hidden option.

Click OK. The object will no longer be visible in the list of objects in the database window.

To make a hidden object visible in Microsoft Access 2003 or earlier:

Click Tools – Options – View. Show all  hidden objects by activating the Hidden      objects option.

Select the object you want to be visible. Click View – Properties or the Properties     button.

Deactivate the Hidden option.

Click OK. The object will now remain visible in the database window if you deactivate the Hidden objects option under Tools – Options – View.

To hide an object in Microsoft Access 2007 or Microsoft Access 2010:

In the Navigation Pane, select the object you wish to hide.

Right-click and select Table Properties.

Activate the Hidden option.

Click OK.

To make a hidden object visible in Microsoft Access 2007 or Microsoft Access 2010:

In Access 2007, click the Office button, then click Access Options. In Access 2010, click the File tab, then click Options.

Click Current Database.

Click Navigation Options.

View all  hidden objects by activating the Show Hidden Objects option.

Click OK.

Select the object you wish to remain visible.

Right-click and select Table Properties.

De-activate  the Hidden option.

Click OK. The object will now remain visible in the Navigation Pane if you deactivate the Show Hidden Objects option in the Access Options.

Find out more about our Microsoft Access training courses Sydney, Australia or our Microsoft Access training courses London, UK.

About jdonbavand

I am a trainer of Microsoft Office, Microsoft Project and Crystal Reports. I have called my blog "If Only I'd Known That...." because I hear it so many times in training sessions. In fact, if only I had a £100 (or 150 Aussie dollars)for every time someone says "If only I'd known that." ....
This entry was posted in Microsoft Access, Microsoft Access 2003, Microsoft Access 2007, Microsoft Access 2010 and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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