Microsoft Word – spreading heading across newspaper style columns

You may want to use newspaper-style columns in a document, but want a heading that spans across all columns.

Start by typing in the heading to go across all columns. Press the Enter key.

In Microsoft Word 2007 or Microsoft Word 2010, on the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, click Breaks.

From the dropdown, select Continuous.

On the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, click Columns. From the dropdown, select the number of columns required, or click More Columns to open the Columns dialog box; in this example, we click Two.

Start typing in the text which is to be in the two columns.

As you type, the text wraps to the first column. If the text indents within the paragraph are not as required, select the paragraph, then on the Home tab, click the Paragraph dialog box launcher arrow.

On the Indents and Spacing tab of the Paragraph dialog box, in the Indentation section, decide on the required type of indentation in the Special dropdown box; in this example, we use None, then click OK.

When the bottom of the first column is reached, the text wraps to the top of the second column.

To force the two columns to be of equal length, position the cursor at the end of the second column, then click the Page Layout tab, then in the Page Setup group, click Breaks.

From the dropdown, click Continuous.

The two columns will be of equal length.

To start a new section which goes right across the page, on the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, click Columns. From the dropdown, click One.

Now when we type, the text goes across the page.

In Microsoft Word 2003, click InsertBreak. The Break dialog box will be displayed.

 

Click Continuous. Click OK.

Click the Columns  button on the Standard toolbar and drag across to select the number of columns required. Alternatively, click Format – Columns; the Columns dialog box will be displayed. Select the number of columns required, then click OK.

 

Start typing in the text which is to be in the two columns.

As you type, the text wraps to the first column. If the text indents within the paragraph are not as required, select the paragraph, then click Format Paragraph; the Paragraph dialog box will be displayed.

On the Indents and Spacing tab of the Paragraph dialog box, in the Indentation section, decide on the required type of indentation in the Special dropdown box; in this example, we use none, then click OK.

When the bottom of the first column is reached, the text wraps to the top of the second column.

To force the two columns to be of equal length, position the cursor at the end of the second column, then click Insert – Break. The Break dialog box will be displayed. Click Continuous, then click OK.

To start a new section which goes right across the page, click the Columns toolbar button and drag across to just select one column; alternatively, click Format Columns, select the number of columns as being one, then click OK.

Now when we type, the text goes across the page.

For details of our Microsoft Word training in the London area, visit http://www.jmdtraining.co.uk/microsoft-office-training/microsoft-word-training

or for details of our Microsoft Word training in the Sydney area, visit http://www.jmdtraining.com.au/microsoft-office-training/microsoft-word-training.

About jdonbavand

I am a trainer of Microsoft Office, Microsoft Project and Crystal Reports. I have called my blog "If Only I'd Known That...." because I hear it so many times in training sessions. In fact, if only I had a £100 (or 150 Aussie dollars)for every time someone says "If only I'd known that." ....
This entry was posted in Microsoft Word, Microsoft Word 2003, Microsoft Word 2007, Microsoft Word 2010, Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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