Excel – Using absolute cell references in SUMIF, COUNTIF, SUMIFS, COUNTIFS, etc

When you are using a function such as COUNTIF, the syntax is =COUNTIF(Criteria_range, criteria). In general the criteria needs to be enclosed in double quotes.

What happens if you want to reference a cell as part of your criteria?

Say, in the above example, I want to count those whose % change is greater than the number in cell E10.

In this case, the formula needs to be =COUNTIF(D3:D8,”>”&E10)

Similarly if I had named cell E10, say as Target, the formula would be =COUNTIF(D3:d8,”>”&Target)

If I wanted to total the cells in Q2 where the % change was bigger than the number in cell E10, the formula would be =SUMIF(D3:D8,”>”&E10,C3:C8)

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About jdonbavand

I am a trainer of Microsoft Office, Microsoft Project and Crystal Reports. I have called my blog "If Only I'd Known That...." because I hear it so many times in training sessions. In fact, if only I had a £100 (or 150 Aussie dollars)for every time someone says "If only I'd known that." ....
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